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Old 03-22-2004, 12:22 PM   #1
Deadscale
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Default Oops! An Asteroid is coming our way...Oh? You didn't get the memo...

K, I'm adding more drama to it

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...malizeresponse

An asteroid flew past Earth last week so close that it nearly entered an orbital halo where weather satellites roam. Scientists spotted it March 15 and watched it zoom by just three days later. It posed no threat, but there are hundreds of thousands more where that one came from.

And while asteroid 2004 FH, as it is known, was watched calmly by astronomers, a more frightening scenario unfolded two months earlier:

An unprecedented asteroid scare in January had astronomers worried for a few hours over a rock that had a 1-in-4 chance of hitting Earth during the next few days. At the time, some of the scientists were unsure who should be notified. The event has prompted NASA (news - web sites) to set up a formal process for notifying top officials in the future of any impending impacts, SPACE.com has learned.
Anyone have the slightest clue how these things (asteroids) are tracked? Or how our safety cushion is watched over?

Sounds like someone fell asleep during their sky gazing hour or thought it didn't pose a threat at the time. Then again maybe there are just too many to watch over.

I wouldn't want to just wake up and find a huge dust cloud blocking out the sun, info would be nice
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Old 03-22-2004, 12:23 PM   #2
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Anyone have the slightest clue how these things (asteroids) are tracked
We have at last found a use for rangers...
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Old 03-22-2004, 12:26 PM   #3
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To quote a line from "Armageddon", "It's a big ass sky sir!!"
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Old 03-22-2004, 01:02 PM   #4
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Its nearly impossible to watch the whole sky. In fact you have to have positions set up on boths side of the world and on each side of the equator to be able to see "most" of the heavens.

To top it off most asteroids are discovered by ameteur astronomers or clubs. The fact of the matter is we get hit by asteroids all the time. its just that they are not big enough to last through the friction of entry into our atmosphere. It would have to be hella huge to do siginificant damage to Earth.
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Old 03-22-2004, 01:25 PM   #5
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If we all die, we all die. If Christians are right, only those who have accepted Jesus will go to Heaven. If Muslims are right, infidels will get what's coming to them. If Buddhists are right...etc, etc. If atheists are right, natural selection just selected us to oblivion. There is only one correct choice...better make it quick!
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Old 03-22-2004, 01:30 PM   #6
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Anyone have the slightest clue how these things (asteroids) are tracked? Or how our safety cushion is watched over?
Lol you watch too many sci fi movies, if any asteroid of any formidable size is headed for the Earth, the only safety net NASA can provide is church service so you can get right with your deity before the end comes. We have NO safety net.
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Old 03-22-2004, 02:09 PM   #7
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Lol you watch too many sci fi movies, if any asteroid of any formidable size is headed for the Earth, the only safety net NASA can provide is church service so you can get right with your deity before the end comes. We have NO safety net.
Yeh, I do watch too many sci-fi movies
(cheap B-Movies are cool! Re-Animator?)

By the safety cushion I meant that some asteroids are labeled(?) and then looked into. Some are long shots in hitting us, and then others that are looked more into as they are closer to our orbit or whatever you wanna call it. If that's what you think I meant, and if they don't do any of that labeling, then yeh I'm a sci-fi geek /sobs

Guess I just figured the technology is more advanced that what it really is, who knows what they have behind those closed doors! /eerie music

(Just got out of my math class and that makes me...weirder than usual and gets me all worked up, I need my momma! )
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Old 03-22-2004, 02:16 PM   #8
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Well man, ill give you an idea, we have a failed space shuttle program, we are returning to rockets like from the 60s nd 70s. We have IDEAS on modules that could VERY slowly deflect a major asteroid if we see it soon enough, but none have been built nor tested. They would be ineffective at best on a late sighting (i think we need a 10 year or more warning) and even if we spotted one very far away we still havent developed the modules to save our ass.

Right now the world is just as vulnerable to asteroids as the cavemen were, just pray a big one doesnt wipe us out.
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Old 03-22-2004, 02:17 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Martigan
There is only one correct choice...better make it quick!
Peekachoo, I choose you!!!
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Old 03-22-2004, 02:54 PM   #10
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So far as may be determined, we don't really have a safety cushion, to quote 'Armmaggedon' these babies are " ..a life-sucking bitch from which there is no escape".

Once Asteroids are set on a course directly into Earth all life here is doomed.

An asteroid is easily the size of a suburb, some much larger, maybe the size of a small state (bigger than Rhode Island). Depending on trajectory, on what each is basically composed of, and the size, they aint gonna fry much in Earth's atmosphere - before impact - especially if coming in straight at Earth rather than across the sky tangentially.

You got to picture the bow wave one of those things would generate at 300000mph or whutever, having a surface profile of anything from 10's of sq. miles to hundreds of sq. miles across the face. It would be phenomanally huge, a devastating shockwave radiating from that throughout Earth's atmosphere, and its friction super heating the air. Then depending on fall zone, in the Ocean a super-heated flash generating enough energy to charge an atomic storm of seperated hydrogen and oxygen from water vapor, and chaining water into fuel. Some thinking says the crater hole would draw water from the ocean, then the reaction stuff follows. I think the bow wave would blow water like a slug jacket and the asteroid would ultimately weld to the earth's crust, like an inclusion in a metal casting, losing lots of kinetic energy along the way much like we do running across sand.

We alas would simply be vaporised as mostly being water, every body of water, every living water vessel, would simultaneously undergo the global impact gradient's kinetic energy translation. A whole lot of other stuff is going on but from the colossal energy input, it no longer becomes a point source thing. Because the time interval this world killer event takes to travel throughout the globe means everything is getting the same picture with minimal loss of initial force effect: it is a bodily reaction.

The crater impact boring through the Earth's crust MIGHT send a shockwave through to the Earth's mantle. If penetrating deeper than that, then okay rippling back ******dly, from the Earth's core, but anyway causing massive Continental upheavals. Whichever but I doubt either. Worst case, collision possibly having a billiard ball effect on random areas of earthcrust such that even a city or two may get bodily ejected into space. No air, lost gravity and deep fried etc. etc.

A tidal wave miles high would arrive almost simultaneous with the catastrophic earthquakes, an energy storm cresting it. The atmospheric shockwave would have already killed a lot of stuff, the heat flash would finish off more stuff left over. Finally the tidal wave and worldwide quakes and vulcanism would take care of the rest. Total elapsed time a coupla seconds.

A coupla hundred years later maybe the skies would clear a bit, nuthin would grow etc etc. Make sure you're tucked in.
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Old 03-22-2004, 10:26 PM   #11
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I would worry more about asteroids if the climate was better understood.

You think asteroid horror stories are good? You should hear what an ice age can do.
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Old 03-22-2004, 10:50 PM   #12
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We'll take an average asteroid of say 80 feet, pretty irregular shape and mostly made of heavy metals. if it hit water it'd likely cause massive ocean disturbances in the ocean it hit causing tidal waves of the 100 foot variaty around the surrounding ocean, and unusual ocean activities for a day or two world-wide. if it hit land you could expect about a 100 mile radius of earth to be royal screwed and earthquakes and shockwaves felt over most the hemisphere. Yeah it'd be terrible but it'd hardly be world ending. This is the type of asteroid we'd be most at risk to because their hard to detect in advance, and larger objects are more likely to be spotted with advanced notice, and im sure governments would set aside petty issues like "cost" when global devistation is at stake.

edit:
Though i would like to add, an asteroid travelling at misty's rate (300,000mph) would likely shatter the planet. I'm not prepared to do a ballistics estimation on something like that but it'd likely be a few years before earth became a recognizable mass again. Luckily most asteroids would move in the 10-30k mph range.

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Old 03-22-2004, 10:55 PM   #13
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I'm more scared about global warming than an asteroid
You can't stop either though (yet).

(some sort of natural disaster flick is going to be coming out on Memorial Day, can't remember the name)
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Old 03-22-2004, 11:20 PM   #14
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We can do what they did on the Simpsons. It almost worked too.
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Old 03-22-2004, 11:32 PM   #15
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I liked what they did in Armageddon. Let's send a bunch of misfits, and for the love of God, Ben Affleck, up to intercept them. I'd like us to keep Bruce Willis this time, though. We got cheated in that deal. Just think, if Ben had stayed to push the trigger, Bennifer might have been avoided!

As for the real threat, I can honestly say I haven't given it much thought. There are ways to guestimate trajectory, speed, direction, etc., and maybe get some idea as to what's a threat and what's not. When it all comes down to it, I'm afraid we'd be sorely incapable of defending ourselves. I'm glad there are smarter people than me working on that situation.
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Old 03-23-2004, 03:07 AM   #16
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The science in Armegeddon was pure bullshit. Makes the magic system of EQ look real by comparison.
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Old 03-23-2004, 03:13 AM   #17
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Well of course it was bullshit. Surely we weren't really supposed to believe that was scientifically feasible. It was supposed to be pretty and dramatic, and bring in lots and lots of money, which it did.

Though I'd like to believe we could send Affleck into outer space and have him nuke himself on the backside of an asteroid somewhere...

So much h8.
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Old 03-23-2004, 04:48 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Brigiid
Well of course it was bullshit. Surely we weren't really supposed to believe that was scientifically feasible.
Of course to you maybe, but you may or may not be surprised at the raging debates out there how factual the science in Armageddon was.
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Old 03-23-2004, 12:53 PM   #19
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Just one person's perspective of the science, but I'm a driller. I am also a biologist, so I have plenty of science type training, and let me tell you, it's so far from fact I laughed. Oh, Armageddon wasn't a comedy?

I saw it with a couple of crews that worked for me the first time. When we saw them trying to drill through iron ferrite, with those bits, and needed like 200ft/hr, we all laughed. I wondered, and so did everyone else that knows physics...where did all the cuttings coming out of the hole go? and what moved them out of the hole? Just an FYI, drilling that big of a hole, through any media even remotely as hard as iron ferrite type material, would be ~ 2ft/hour with 200,000 lbs of weight on the bit, to put it into perspective.

As far as watching the heavens, I heard recently that there are more stars in the sky than there are grains of sand in all the deserts and beaches on Earth. I really don't even wanna try to watch asteroids, because gawd is going to save all us neo-cons anyway.


Couple of pointless points in my myriad ramblings just because I am bored.

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Old 03-23-2004, 08:15 PM   #20
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Actually, I can shed some light there too. Think of the diameter of the drilling bit, the operator needs to set an optimum feed rate for the Iron ferrite (mineral?) material removal rate of 'X' feet-per-minute. But cutting speed is determined by what kind of material the cutter is made of, and what you are cutting. It follows too that the bigger the diameter of your drill, the LOWER the rpm to maintain maximum cutting speed (in feet-per-minute at which your tool bit actually removes this material).

It would seem you cannot load the cutter with a material removal rate of several feet per minute if it is only traversing a few feet per minute per rev at so many revs a minute. The cutter must spin through the revs at a greater rate of feet-per-minute around the hole circumference than it is cutting said hole (at 'X' feet-per-minute) through the material.

Case closed.
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Old 03-23-2004, 08:22 PM   #21
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Yeah, actually Misty a bit that size, (~24-36"??) turns at about 60 rpm to maintain optimum cutting and penetration. With no cooling medium, and no cuttings removal by any means, the friction alone would burn the bit up in less than 10'. It's all just Hollywood crap anyway.

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Old 03-23-2004, 10:20 PM   #22
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Your average 80 foot meteor would burn up in the atmosphere long before it hit the earth. Even decent sized 120 foot meteor, assuming it came in on the exact trajectory necessary, Would be smaller than a pea when it landed. Unless it tried to land somewhere in LA in which case it would hit the smog and be dissolved instantly.

Sheesh people, get real. We've had sattalites and space ships crash into the planet before, no biggie. No different than a meteor.

Come on guys, this isn't FF VII. Wake up and smell the air friction.
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Old 03-23-2004, 10:42 PM   #23
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Regarding the guy who commented that the simpson idea to blow up the asteroid (comet) was a good idea. Say we had advance warning about one of those armaggeddon sized Asteroids heading for earth. those run about a half mile or 3 miles (been years sinc ei seen the movie) in order for a nuke to blow soemthing like that up we would need a 1000 megaton blast a 1k megaton blast is,
1, not possible with our current tech (our biggest nukes go about 50 megatons?)

2, just as dangerous to planet earth as the asteroid , a 1k blast would blow us up literally

3, would more than likely only knock the humongous asteroid into one or 3 slightly smaller pieces and still hurtle towards earth sealing our fate.


The only idea ive seen which might work is if we had enough warning, launch many many modules to land on the asteroid, which by when deployed extracts solar panels harnessing the sun's power and ever so slightly push the asteroid off course, much like a sail on a boat. We have this tech already but using radio waves for comm satellites.
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Old 03-23-2004, 11:05 PM   #24
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an 80 foot meteor wouldnt burn up. i dont think. I could prolly put forth the math if i was that sadistic.
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Old 03-24-2004, 12:17 AM   #25
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Damn, Simpsons science once again falls short. Back to working on my plan to block out the sun I guess.
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