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Old 01-17-2008, 02:30 PM   #1
Drysdale
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Default We could learn something from Ireland

No, I don't mean alcohol consumption.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/17/bu...e r=TOPIXNEWS

DUBLIN — Ireland is now alive with enthusiasm for entrepreneurs, who seemingly rank just below rock stars in popularity.

For evidence, consider the Ernst & Young accounting firm’s award for Irish Entrepreneur of the Year. The award show was prime-time television fare in October. (The winner, Liam Casey, runs a business, now based in China, that arranges for products to be manufactured and shipped from China to customers in Europe and the United States.)

Then there are the government-sponsored studies proclaiming that Ireland ranks third in the European Union in early-stage entrepreneurial activity. And Enterprise Ireland, an agency of the Irish government that gives fledgling small companies a helping hand, has even leased space in an office building in Midtown Manhattan to serve as an incubator for businesses hoping to expand into the American market.

The relatively new emphasis on entrepreneurs in Ireland is the culmination of nearly four decades of government policies that have lifted the economy from centuries of poverty to modern prosperity.

The change began when Ireland entered the European Union in 1973. In subsequent years, the government rewrote its tax policies to attract foreign investment by American corporations, made all education free through the university level and changed tax rates and used direct equity investment to encourage Irish people to set up their own businesses.

“The change came in the 1990s,” said James Murphy, founder and managing director of Lifes2Good, a marketer of drugstore products for muscle aches, hair loss and other maladies. “Taxes and interest rates came down, and all of a sudden we believed in ourselves.”

The new environment also encouraged Ray Nolan, who founded Raven Computing in 1989 to provide software for lawyers to keep track of billable hours. He sold that company and founded another that created software for companies to manage billing and receipts. And in 1999, he founded Web Reservations International to provide booking and property management for hostels that cater to backpackers and economy travelers.

“Hostel owners needed to keep track of people sharing rooms, and bookings for Americans coming to Dublin for three nights,” said Feargal Mooney, chief operating officer of Web Reservations. “Hostel accommodations go for 10 to 20 euro a night,” he said, or $15 to $30 at today’s exchange rates, “so booking reservations in them wasn’t profitable for the big travel companies.”

As the business grew — its 100 employees and banks of computers now handle reservations for some 50,000 hostels in 166 countries — Web Reservations was offered an equity investment by Enterprise Ireland. “But we said this is our baby, we didn’t want to give up equity,” Mr. Mooney said.

But the company, which is expanding in the United States and in China, has taken advantage of the agency’s help to open operations in Shanghai and New York. “They’ve helped us with introductions to government officials in China, and we’re in the office space on Park Avenue, expanding our systems in the States,” Mr. Mooney said.

Government help for Irish entrepreneurs grew out of an overall economic policy devised in 1987 that reduced personal taxes, said Kevin Sherry, a director of Enterprise Ireland who specializes in start-up companies.

Income tax rates in Ireland today are 20 percent on the first $50,000 of income and 41 percent on income above that. But there are value-added taxes of 21 percent levied on all goods and transactions, with the exception of health and medical services, children’s clothing and food.

The tax on corporate profits, though, is 12.5 percent, which is an incentive to own a business. And government helps out. “We have helped over 300 people or groups in the last dozen years or so,” Mr. Sherry said.

Enterprise Ireland has also put up initial capital for venture investment funds and supports research and development. “We must support new approaches, nanotechnology, biotechnology and other sciences,” Mr. Sherry said, “because we cannot succeed in the future using what got us here in the past.”
More at webpage if you're interested
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:02 PM   #2
Aerrow Trueflight
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So all i have to do in Ireland is find a source in china that will sell me items that people in europe want and make it happen? Sweet, next stop, Ireland
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:08 PM   #3
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runs a business, now based in China, that arranges for products to be manufactured and shipped from China to customers in Europe and the United States.)
Yeah, can't wait till our business model is to do all of our business with Chinese workers while our workers wages are stagnant. Can't wait till all the budding young entrepreneurs over here run sweat shops in China. That would be a very good thing for our country.
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Old 01-17-2008, 07:12 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by bumbleroot View Post
Yeah, can't wait till our business model is to do all of our business with Chinese workers while our workers wages are stagnant. Can't wait till all the budding young entrepreneurs over here run sweat shops in China. That would be a very good thing for our country.
Why wait? it's already happening.
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Old 01-17-2008, 09:18 PM   #5
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Yeah and its doing wonders for our economy.
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Old 01-18-2008, 04:32 AM   #6
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It's doing wonders for theirs. Wonder what we're doing wrong...
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:16 AM   #7
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Perhaps its that Ireland has amongst the highest Union membership in the world.
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:27 AM   #8
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Yeah, the drop in corporate taxation, spawning a ton of new businesses had nothing to do with it...

You fail at business almost as badly as you fail at life, dude.

And fiscal policy played a central role in transforming the business environment. It began with a cross-party consensus on government spending cutbacks, which gave notice of the political will to restore order to the nation’s finances. That determination paved the way for interest rates to ease and for moderate pay deals and tax cuts. Higher consumption and business investment followed.

Another question: of the net 450,000 jobs created during the past decade, some 335,000 were in the services sector, mainly private market services – how did it happen that these jobs appeared on the scene in the short period of a decade? During the 1980s, the Irish services sector had generated fewer jobs in relation to its GNP by comparison with other OECD countries. This under-performance was related to high taxes, high labour costs, excessive regulation and anti-competitive practices. The change in fiscal policy was important in addressing these weaknesses.
http://www.oecdobserver.org/news/fullstory.php/aid=164

Oh, and THIS was the picture of Ireland in the 80s:
The jobless rate was the highest in Europe at 20%, the nation’s best and brightest were leaving en masse for sunnier economic climates and the public deficit stood at 13%.
http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/st...x?StoryId=6172

But then they got smart:
NESC warned at that time that continuing existing policies was not viable and that “considerable sacrifices” needed to be made, specifically cutbacks in public spending.


This was no easy task, given that middle-income earners were already being taxed over 60% of their wages — while government borrowing was continuing to spiral out of control.
http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/st...x?StoryId=6172

And lower taxation got businesses in to the country:
Large multinationals like Apple, Microsoft and Intel were enticed across the Atlantic through a range of incentives, notably an exceptionally low corporate tax rate of 10% for manufacturers. (Today it stands at 12.5% for all industry).
http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/st...x?StoryId=6172

And to expand on the foreign involvement someone mentioned earlier without understanding it completely:
A thriving economy

The legacy of Ireland’s reforms is undeniably impressive. In 2007, economic growth is expected to reach 6%, double the EU average.

There is virtual full employment — and in an amazing turnaround, Ireland has gone from a country of emigration to one of immigration as the masses flock to the gold-paved streets of Dublin, Cork, Galway and Limerick.

Jobs for everyone

Unlike most of its Western European neighbors, Ireland, with a population of just four million, decided to open up its labor markets to all the new EU member states of
central and Eastern Europe.

The result is that 48% of all new jobs were filled by foreign nationals this year, with up to 200,000 Polish workers in the country and thousands more Latvians, Lithuanians, Chinese and Nigerians.

Despite the dramatic influx, nobody is complaining for the time being, as there are plenty of jobs for everyone.
http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/st...x?StoryId=6172

So no, unions have as little to do with Ireland's success as you have to do with reality, tard.
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"Thou shalt not steal. Except by majority vote." - Gary North

Last edited by Drysdale; 01-18-2008 at 07:55 AM.
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:52 AM   #9
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DD- I probably make more than you, have had a solid management job for about 15 years as well as even at the Director's level. I've grown my departments revenues 6-fold since I took it over as well as cutting expenses. I think I know a little more about business than you do. Your knowledge is based upon what you hear about on the radio or TV or what you read online or in magazines and newspapers. So basically you are a paper tiger. Gee, haven't we heard you been called that before.
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Old 01-18-2008, 08:00 AM   #10
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And i thought print media was dying. How much earlier do you need to get up in the morning to finish the route now that its 6 times bigger?
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Old 01-18-2008, 08:14 AM   #11
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You don't know shit about shit. Ooh! A MANAGER! Wow! A Director! Oooh! Color me unimpressed. I can count on one hand the number of managers I've met in my life that had the brains of a 1st year engineer.

Those who cant do, manage.

You don't know shit except backstabbing, lying, and long boring meetings. Don't pretend you do. If you did, you'd show it here. Instead, you lie, bullshit, and troll. Oh, and get owned by everyone who cares to talk to you.

Oh, and William Hung made more money than I did last year as well. How much you make doesn't mean shit. I make a very good living with a growth potential that's out of this world. And I could triple my salary if I were willing to put up with the work conditions...
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"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."
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"Thou shalt not steal. Except by majority vote." - Gary North

Last edited by Drysdale; 01-18-2008 at 08:23 AM.
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Old 01-18-2008, 08:25 AM   #12
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You don't know shit about shit. Ooh! A MANAGER! Wow! A Director! Oooh! Color me unimpressed. I can count on one hand the number of managers I've met in my life that had the brains of a 1st year engineer.

Those who cant do, manage.

You don't know shit except backstabbing, lying, and long boring meetings.
Well I didn't get into management because I knew someone. I got here by doing things right. And tell us Mr. Smart Guy. How come you haven't been promoted? Tell us also, what qualifications do you have to speak about business decisions? How often have you made them? Have you ever dealt with unions? Do you know how to deal with them? Do you understand the benefits of them vs. the problems they cause? Are all the things you speak of based upon any experiences you have had or are they based upon some ideology you have read?
Look, when you get a chance to actually do something about it, come back and talk. Until then, keep your origami roars to yourself. They mean nothing with your lack of experience.

And just so you know, I am not in favor of unions as a whole. I believe they are needed in some places and times but I also believe that a company ought to provide the necessary tools to employees so a union isn't needed.
As far as Ireland, the Unions there have worked. And if you are complaining that they are socialist. I have one name for you "Lech Walesa" He was the one who used the Unions to overthrow the USSR's grip on Poland and thus start the downfall of the great Communist experiment in the USSR.
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Old 01-18-2008, 08:35 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by bumbleroot View Post
Well I didn't get into management because I knew someone. I got here by doing things right. And tell us Mr. Smart Guy. How come you haven't been promoted? Tell us also, what qualifications do you have to speak about business decisions? How often have you made them? Have you ever dealt with unions? Do you know how to deal with them? Do you understand the benefits of them vs. the problems they cause? Are all the things you speak of based upon any experiences you have had or are they based upon some ideology you have read?
Do you have an MBA?

My father has 18 years management experience, with little else than a high school diploma.

He hated it. He now runs his own business out of his home.

Being a 'manager' doesn't mean much, bumbles.
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Old 01-18-2008, 09:47 AM   #14
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Do you have an MBA?

My father has 18 years management experience, with little else than a high school diploma.

He hated it. He now runs his own business out of his home.

Being a 'manager' doesn't mean much, bumbles.
I don't have an MBA only a BA.

Sounds like your father has done pretty good for himself.
I'm sure the 18 years of management taught him nothing about running a business.
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Old 01-18-2008, 10:05 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by DD
I can count on one hand the number of managers I've met in my life that had the brains of a 1st year engineer.

Those who cant do, manage.
While I acknowledge that the mere fact of being a "manager" isn't much, there is a significant difference between just any manager and one who has a technical background.

Case in point is my girlfriend who is currently a 1st year Mechanical Engineer for a major defense contractor. She talked to several other senior engineers and she is now pursuing her MBA as opposed to a technical degree such as a master's in Aerospace Engineering.

The drawback to getting the technical degree is that your growth is capped at the technical level. If you get the MBA, you are unbound as far as your future positions go.

But in either case, if you prefer the 'hands-on' approach over meetings and such, then the technical degree is definitely the way to go.

I'm definitely planning on getting my MBA soon so that I can mix my B.S. degree with a business degree. My goal is to eventually open my own small business or franchise.
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Old 01-18-2008, 10:26 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by furo View Post
While I acknowledge that the mere fact of being a "manager" isn't much, there is a significant difference between just any manager and one who has a technical background.
Those are usually the ones I count that are worth a shit.
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Old 01-18-2008, 10:26 AM   #17
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I can count on one hand the number of managers I've met in my life that had the brains of a 1st year engineer.

Those who cant do, manage.
Well suffice it to say, I do rather well. And if you think managing is a walk in the park it isn't. You learn to get the blame and learn to take the blame. You also learn how to get things done or else you will work 90 hour weeks (a mistake I did early in my management career).

Your wrong-headed assumption that management is only for those that can't do is wrong. In my industry it is for those that know how to get things done.

There are bad managers, most of the bad ones have no people skills or they care about themselves more than they do the welfare of their department. The bad ones also are the first ones to point fingers. And time and time again, the bad managers lose their jobs.
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Old 01-18-2008, 10:28 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by bumbleroot View Post
Well I didn't get into management because I knew someone. I got here by doing things right. And tell us Mr. Smart Guy. How come you haven't been promoted?
Who says I haven't?

I'm making 2.75X what I was in 2003.

Doing things right... Suuure you were. Screw up, move up, they always say!

People who are good at their jobs don't get a lot of promotions. At least not in my field. They just get more money.
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"Thou shalt not steal. Except by majority vote." - Gary North
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Old 01-18-2008, 10:30 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by bumbleroot View Post
As far as Ireland, the Unions there have worked. And if you are complaining that they are socialist. I have one name for you "Lech Walesa" He was the one who used the Unions to overthrow the USSR's grip on Poland and thus start the downfall of the great Communist experiment in the USSR.
And yet every economic paper I've seen to date hasn't made one mention of your precious unions. Why? because they don't come into play with success. Unions seldom do. Small to medium entrepreneurs are fueling the boom over in Ireland, not monolithic outdated organizations who're too busy stealing from their own to get ahead.
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"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."
-Robert A. Heinlein

"Thou shalt not steal. Except by majority vote." - Gary North
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