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Old 12-27-2004, 02:50 AM   #1
AresProphet
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Default Reggie White dead at 43

http://espn.go.com/classic/s/Whitememories.html

This is a sad time for football. One of the greatest defensive players of the modern era, a shoe-in for the Hall of Fame

Sleep apnea usually isn't fatal, is it? This just seems so weird and sudden.
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Old 12-27-2004, 03:46 AM   #2
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Reggie was an awesome player. Truly someone to aspire to on and off the field I am sure he will be missed sorely by his peers.

I am not for sure on the sleep apnea thing Ares as I have pretty limited knowledge when it comes to that
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Old 12-27-2004, 06:21 AM   #3
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Sleep Apnea isn't generally fatal, but there is always a definite chance that it can be. People with sleep apnea literally stop breathing for long periods of time, and the reduced amount of oxygen in their blood stream could have several adverse effects.
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Old 12-27-2004, 07:38 AM   #4
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I'm actually doing a financial model over my winter break for a small company that has developed a sleep apnea therapy. There's a very strong tie between sleep apnea and heart problems, essentially because the heart pumps harder to overcome oxygen deficits caused by the sleep apnea. Central apneas are even worse and represent a severe problem with the autonomic nervous system, that's where the brain actually fails to tell the lungs to breathe.

You should see the shit people wear to treat severe sleep apneas though. Think of wearing a face mask all night long that forces air into you, even when you're exhaling. It's no wonder patient retention for most of these therapies is so low- it's a miserable solution to a miserable problem
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Old 12-27-2004, 08:49 AM   #5
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I have a sleep apnea/snoring problem, had most of my life. When I went to the doctor, he gave me options such as breaking my jaw, a tracheotomy or a gas mask type breathing apparatus Hormadrune is talking about. Horm is right, treatments for SA are sometimes worse than the problem, "Here, we can break your jaw, you can breathe but you can't chew properly any more".

It is sad about Reggie White, super guy!
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Old 12-27-2004, 11:31 AM   #6
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I do as well, but not nearly as severe as my 4 year old son did. About 6 months ago, they took out his tonsils and adenoids, as they were so large naturally, that when he slept, they obstructed his airway. Ever since then, he's had no problems whatsoever. I wonder if a simple surgery like that will help most people? In adults, especially, as most doctors I talk to say they don't normally do surgeries like that...they have to do sleep studies first in adults, i was told. not sure if that is entirely accurate, but I'm not a doctor, either. I'd like to hear more about the therapy the company you are doing work for is developing, Horm. Is there anything related to tonsils/adenoids at all? I ask, because it did work for my son.
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Old 12-27-2004, 12:46 PM   #7
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That's probably not sleep apnea, which is typically classified as a psychological disorder. Horm's got it right: the brain doesn't properly tell a sleeping person to breathe, and they can wake up anywhere from several to a hundred times per night because they need to catch their breath. Something obstructing the airways would be something else.

Some victims say they rarely become conscious to breathe, or that they don't remember having woken up, but most do have problems getting a good night's rest because of it.

There are some variants which are related to problems with the diaphragm but it's not quite the same thing. You've got to restructe the entire respiratory system to be able to get around the problem, which isn't possible, so then you've got to invent some crazy and inconvenient workaround.


I didn't know about the heart problems but that sounds logical. Pretty much everything I know about the disorder is the parts relating to the brain.
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Old 12-27-2004, 01:47 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Offem
I do as well, but not nearly as severe as my 4 year old son did. About 6 months ago, they took out his tonsils and adenoids, as they were so large naturally, that when he slept, they obstructed his airway. Ever since then, he's had no problems whatsoever. I wonder if a simple surgery like that will help most people? In adults, especially, as most doctors I talk to say they don't normally do surgeries like that...they have to do sleep studies first in adults, i was told. not sure if that is entirely accurate, but I'm not a doctor, either. I'd like to hear more about the therapy the company you are doing work for is developing, Horm. Is there anything related to tonsils/adenoids at all? I ask, because it did work for my son.
The company I'm doing finance/biz-strat for is actually an add-on product for existing therapy. Many people with severe sleep/central apneas use the mask device I mentioned hooked up to a machine. The most common type of machine is called a CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure), and it essentially continually blows air into the patient. The add-on the company I'm consulting alters the air mixture, which is particularly important for certain subsets of the overall apnea population. So while I'm a step or 3 away from the clinical side of things, as far as I know it isn't related to tonsils/adenoids. I'm still learning about it though- I'm not remotely expert in the field (I did neuroscience for 2 years but it was non-related research in mouse-models, never clinical therapies).

For your son it seems it was an anatomical defect (pardon the term), not a neurological condition, much like a deviated septum (that thing that separates your nostrils) which can also cause respiratory problems. So surgery is a solution for some sleep patients, but this company is aimed at patients suffering from a neurological condition. Severe central apneas are generally considered terminal conditions currently- life expectancy for many at diagnosis is less than a year.

You're right about the sleep studies. Before docs will prescribe the machines I'm talking about you have to get a polysomnogram (probably spelled wrong- it's basically like an EKG but to monitor your sleep).
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Old 12-28-2004, 09:43 AM   #9
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Thank you for the information! I didn't know that a deviated septum was considered to be neurological. To be quite honest, I thought that happened from say a broken nose, and severe sinus infections that eat away at the septum. My father had to had surgery on his (if I'm not mistaken, but it didn't really help relieve snoring or the like). I'd be interested to read what is learned over the course of this study.

I do however understand what you are saying that there is indeed a difference in anatomical and neurological defect. Also, I have heard of CPAP, but for some reason, I am relating it to a nebulizer (sp?) or breathing treatments of that sort. Am I close to the comparison?
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Old 12-28-2004, 10:06 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Offem
Thank you for the information! I didn't know that a deviated septum was considered to be neurological. To be quite honest, I thought that happened from say a broken nose, and severe sinus infections that eat away at the septum. My father had to had surgery on his (if I'm not mistaken, but it didn't really help relieve snoring or the like). I'd be interested to read what is learned over the course of this study.
It's not- it's an anatomical defect- but it can cause respiratory problems- sorry if I was confusing. Most people have a slightly deviated septum- it's only a problem for moderate to severe deviations however. I had a friend in HS who had a moderate to severe deviation in his and it sounded like he had a cold year round because of it. He too had it operated on but I lost touch with him during college so I'm not sure how it turned out.

I do however understand what you are saying that there is indeed a difference in anatomical and neurological defect. Also, I have heard of CPAP, but for some reason, I am relating it to a nebulizer (sp?) or breathing treatments of that sort. Am I close to the comparison?
Nebulizers essentially apply a fine liquid mist- my grandfather took medication twice daily for his emphysema via a nebulizer before he passed several years ago. Insofar as I understand CPAP (and bi-PAP and other related therapies), it's purely gaseous treatment- just blowing air or an air+something mixture.
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Old 12-28-2004, 10:19 AM   #11
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I'm sorry to hear of your grandfathers passing. It's so horrible when you lose a loved one/family member. Also, thank you for the clarification on septums, not being neurological, as well as explaining the difference between CPAP, Bi-Pap, and nebulizer treatments. When my oldest son was an infant, the doctors said he had mild RSV, and he was given nebulizer treatments as well as an inhaler with a small breathing chamber to administer the medication. It really did wonders to help him get better. I suppose that's why I was a bit confused in comparing the different treatment styles. I had heard of CPAP, and thought the two were one in the same, just with different names.
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